A Case for Visionary Fiction, Part 2: What Goes into the Bucket?

Editor’s note: The following guest post by Victor Smith is the second of a three-part series on Visionary Fiction aimed at increasing awareness of the genre and helping readers discover, explore, and enjoy Visionary Fiction.Picasso quote art

Let’s suppose, as projected in Part One of this series, “The Bucket,” that Visionary Fiction becomes as prominent a genre label as Science Fiction or Mystery.  Now let’s consider the ingredients writers must put into a work to have it qualify for the Visionary Fiction bucket and what experiences or benefits readers can expect in a work pulled out of that bucket.

Arguments over some elements have raged for decades and will go on for decades more. Ours is a quantum world where every story has elements of just about every other story; but some stories have more in common than others. Here we examine the essential components, leaving the optional and controversial elements for later discussion.

Well-written Fiction

In The Secrets of Ebook Publishing Success, Mark Coker states as Secret # 1: “Write a great book,” which is almost too obvious to deserve mention. Regrettably, Visionary Fiction and similar genres have attracted a disproportionate number of authors (many from other professions) with brilliant ideas but inferior writing skills, thus forcing readers to wade through a bin of sub-par products before finding something worthwhile. A few VF works with glaring deficiencies in standard fictional practice, like James Redfield’s Celestine Prophecy, did rocket up the best-seller lists, propelled perhaps by novelty. This misled aspiring authors to assume that a sublime message trumps amateur writing. All elements of good fiction—language, plot, character, setting, imagery, etc.—remain prerequisites in VF. Rules, of course, can be consciously broken, but only deliberately.

In “The Puzzle of Visionary Fiction,” Hal Zina Bennet makes several points pertinent to crafting quality Visionary Fiction:

“What happens in most visionary fiction that I’ve read over the years is that it gets burdened down by the author’s desire to get readers to believe what he or she believes. Characters disappear in the author’s message, which is another way of saying that they are two-dimensional, thinly disguised vehicles that simply recite the author’s beliefs. An engaging story is simply lacking and the writing never quite brings readers into that place of wonder, fear, discovery, which might transcend simple belief systems. We try to reproduce our own spiritual experiences on the page rather than giving readers what they need to have that experience for themselves.”

Growth in Consciousness

Here is author Michael Gurian’s opening line on his pioneering VF website:

image005

“Visionary fiction is fiction in which the expansion of the human mind drives the plot.”

And the first characteristic of VF, according to the Visionary Fiction Alliance:

“Growth of consciousness is the central theme of the story and drives the protagonist, and/or other important characters.”

In “The Altered State of Visionary Fiction,” Monty Joynes writes:

“For me, the Visionary Fiction genre includes novels that deal with shifts in awareness that result in metaphysical understanding by the central characters.  The plot of the novel is generally more concerned with internal experiences than with external.”

All the commentators I consulted on the basic nature of VF agree that expansion of the mind or growth in consciousness is the hallmark of Visionary Fiction.

In any credible story the characters must change, but in VF this change is from the inside out rather than from outside in. The reader sits in the co-pilot’s chair and gets to mind-read the pilot’s thoughts, intentions and decisions as they occur. He witnesses how the protagonist’s thinking influences external outcomes and how he adjusts to respond to the “slings and arrows of outrageous fortune.”

Growth in consciousness dictates that Visionary Fiction be optimistic. In materially based stories, birth inevitably results in death. In VF, birth begets rebirth at a higher level. Mind/consciousness development is the make-break ingredient in Visionary Fiction. If it’s missing, it’s not Visionary Fiction—it’s that simple.

The Reader Shares the Growth Experience

In “The Article that started it all,” author Jodine Turner writes:

“Visionary Fiction is like the legendary Celtic Imram [the mythical heroes’ quest]. The drama and tension of the characters’ adventures is one layer of the tale. All of the usual elements of suspense, conflict, even romance and mystery, are interwoven in the plot. The other layer, deeper and more archetypal, is that mystical inner journey of spiritual awakening. In Visionary Fiction, esoteric wisdom is embedded in story so that the reader can actually experience it, instead of merely learning about it.”

And author Margaret Duarte seconds this notion:

“What separates VF from other speculative fiction is intention.  Besides telling a good story, VF enlightens and encourages readers to expand their awareness of greater possibilities.”Ice Art1

The reader is not only in the cockpit with access to the pilot’s thoughts; she is enticed to think along with him, then grab hold of the controls, and do some flying herself. This element, engineered into the work, is perhaps VF’s most innovative, and also its most difficult to achieve. Visionary Fiction renders the reading experience interactive. The most gratifying comments on my own VF work, The Anathemas, a novel about reincarnation, came from readers who said that my book helped them see how past life experiences influence them today, and yet the book contains no regression technique per se; readers learned through the story’s characters.

We have progressed beyond where readers can just be told (the authority paradigm);instead, give readers the bare essentials and invite them to try it (the Gnostic or experiential model). The best VF is multi-layered to suit readers at different awareness levels. A bonus: rereading such well-constructed books yields a whole different experience the second time through.

The Spiritual Component

When we speak of thoughts, ideas, visualization, consciousness, and internal growth, we are, like it or not, in the spiritual (non-material, by definition) realm rather than in the physical or empirical. The quotes above contain phrases like “metaphysical understanding” and “mystical inner journey of spiritual awakening.” The VF Alliance definition states:

“[Visionary Fiction] embraces spiritual and esoteric wisdom, often from ancient sources, and makes it relevant for our modern life.”

Although it was not always so, the difference between religion and spirituality is now established:

  • Religion refers to a specific set of beliefs and practices agreed upon a group of people; fiction specific to such a community is Religious Fiction.
  • Spirituality is universal in embrace; consciousness, thought, visualization, and change are common to all human beings.Rock1

Because, as put by the VF Alliance, Visionary Fiction “is universal in its worldview and scope,” VF is the genre proper to spirituality. Visionary Fiction should ring as true to a Catholic as to a Buddhist, to a woman as to a man, to a heterosexual as to a homosexual, to an American as to a Polynesian. A tall order but an excellent acid test, and apropos for this age of entrenched dichotomy.

What of fiction that centers on single issues, even if from a spiritual viewpoint: recovery, women’s’ rights, political reform? Since many such topics fall into already established categories and lack the universal ingredient, they would not qualify as VF. We are looking to house orphans, not steal other people’s kids.

Just because VF has a spiritual focus does not mean it is “all sweetness and light.”  As taught in Composition 101, every story requires conflict. Professor Edward Ahearn sees VF as the strident voice of protest against the stagnant status quo. Visionary writers, he says in Visionary Fictions: Apocalyptic Writing from Blake to the Modern Age (2011), seek a personal way to explode the normal experience of the “real,” using prophetic visions, fantastic tales, insane rantings, surrealistic dreams, and drug- or sex-induced dislocations in their work. Their fiction expresses rebellion against all the values of Western civilization—personal, sexual, familial, religious, moral, societal, and political. Ahearn’s “shock and awe” style of VF may be extreme, but a touch of it might prove the antidote against VF’s otherwise Milquetoast reputation.

To conclude on this vital spiritual component, we call on author Theresa Nash, who says in “How I Use Visionary Fiction And It Uses Me”:

“Visionary Fiction is about breaking the rules. It’s about remembering that we write our own stories. The true function of our stories is enabling a harmony between our condition and the Divine. They should inspire us to live our best lives, provide signposts on the journey. They should help us burst through the self-imposed bubble of our human potential to possibilities we can only imagine when we’re mired in chaos, conflict, and survival.”

Paranormal Perceptions

The word visionary implies the ability to see beyond what can be viewed with physical sight. Growth in human consciousness demands that we transcend the five senses when assigning validity to an experience. Thus Monty Joynes can say about VF:

“The work is also ‘visionary’ in the aspect that the authors sometimes (or often) employ non-rational means such as dreams or extrasensory perceptions to develop the content of the book.”

Ice Art2Michael Gurian is more emphatic about this element, saying that in VF such extraordinary phenomena “not only happen, but drive the plot and its characters (i.e. without these experiences, there would be no plot or character).” The VF Alliance holds that VF “oftentimes uses reincarnation, dreams, visions, paranormal, psychic abilities, and other metaphysical plot devices.” In “Visionary Fiction: Rediscovering Ancient Paths to Truth,” Hal Zina Bennett sums it up quite poetically:

“Like a shaman’s stories of the spirit world, where the spirits of animals, trees, sky, or the stars teach us how to live, visionary fiction introduces us to a reality beyond physical reality. They often carry us deep into a consciousness once thought to be the domain of seers, visionaries, oracles and psychics. The magic of this genre is the magic of human consciousness itself, our ability to see beneath the surface and create new visions of what our lives can be.”

While clumsy or exaggerated use of dreams, ghosts, telekinesis or conversations with angels can make a story far-fetched or laughable, super-sensory perceptions, used by a writer who has properly studied, experienced, or intuited such phenomena, blend into the story and move it forward as naturally as an unexpected phone call or unwelcome guest would do in a non-VF tale.

The presence of a paranormal device does not make fiction automatically visionary. A detective story in which a mentalist solves the crime is only  visionary if it probed the mind of the psychic and demonstrated how his gift leads to a higher state of consciousness. On the other hand, certain literary forms like myths, fairy tales, and talking animal stories, which are generally categorized as Fantasy (wholly contrived), should not be summarily exorcised from VF; think Richard Bach’s Jonathan Livingston Seagull.

Conclusion

CO Sunburst1J

Visionary Fiction is still in the “becoming” stage, still emerging as a genre distinct from its various venerable ancestors (Science Fiction, Fantasy or Religious Fiction). Although driven by the current human imperative to evolve mentally and spiritually, this genre still begs for more structure as an art form and a larger niche in the marketplace in which to house its burgeoning creative activity.

In “Part One: The Bucket,” we argued to establish a single brand name, perfect or not: Visionary Fiction. Part Two  aims to initiate a vigorous buzz around the characteristics of Visionary Fiction.

In “Part Three: Visionary Fiction, the Action Plan,” we will examine practical ways the VF community can position the Visionary Fiction bucket, now chock full of goodies in high demand, so that authors can make frequent deposits with confidence in a vibrant marketplace, and readers can make regular withdrawals with a transforming experience guaranteed.

Victor Smith, The Anathemas Visionary Fiction

Victor E. Smith

Photos by Victor E. Smith

Anathemas by Victor E Smith Visionary Fiction

A lifelong proponent of human spiritual evolution, Victor E. Smith has focused on paranormal phenomena and their manifestations.  THE ANATHEMAS, A Novel of Reincarnation and Restitution, is widely available. A prequel and a sequel are well underway.

 

 

Related posts:

Visionary Fiction Part One: The Bucket
Visionary Fiction Part Three: The Action Plan

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40 thoughts on “A Case for Visionary Fiction, Part 2: What Goes into the Bucket?

    • I also think that Vic did a TERRIFIC job on this article. He’s pull together so many threads and ideas about Visionary Fiction into a cohesive whole, and has captured the essence of what VF is and could be. Vic, you really should submit this article to a national publication.

      Everyone (particularly non-VFA writers), how do you feel about what Vic wrote in his first guest article, A Case for Visionary Fiction, which tries to sort through and make sense of the myriad names for this new genre?

  1. Hi Vic,
    Excellent and thorough article – well put! Love this article and how you weaved the pioneer authors and new authors of VF into the article.
    I liked where you say “We have progressed beyond where readers can just be told (the authority paradigm);instead, give readers the bare essentials and invite them to try it (the Gnostic or experiential model). ” So, true and a hallmark of this genre. A great comparison/analogy.

    And, yes, I so agree that VF is not all sweetness and light, which is a common trap of New Age positive thinking that does not reflect the depth and wholeness of VF. Again, well said.

  2. ” Visionary writers, he says in Visionary Fictions: Apocalyptic Writing from Blake to the Modern Age (2011), seek a personal way to explode the normal experience of the “real,” using prophetic visions, fantastic tales, insane rantings, surrealistic dreams, and drug- or sex-induced dislocations in their work. Their fiction expresses rebellion against all the values of Western civilization—personal, sexual, familial, religious, moral, societal, and political. Ahearn’s “shock and awe” style of VF may be extreme, but a touch of it might prove the antidote against VF’s otherwise Milquetoast reputation.”

    Great article Vic. Much of the VF I admire falls under this definition. When I read a VF book, I want my mind to be blown and my opinions challenged. I demand the same from my own writing. If I don’t freak myself out, I’m not digging deep enough.

    • Thanks, Jodine.
      Glad you picked up on the authority/experiential dichotomy. The real trick is getting us human beings, creatures of habit that we are, to be willing to try something different, especially when it comes to thinking. This, somewhat accidentally, has become thematic in my work. It seems to come down to responsibility. When thinking is based on authority, if something goes wrong, it is someone else’s fault. When thinking is based on inner experience, any mistake is solely my own. As a risk taker I like it the latter way but feel I am still in the minority there.

      • Thanks, Eleni. I intend to get Ahearn’s book and study it. He treats VF as quite an old genre, going back at least to William Blake. Am toying with getting an entry ready on VF for Wikipedia (there isn’t one out there yet), and giving it adequate historical roots will lend it proper gravitas!

  3. I wonder if writers of multiple novels that are not genre specific write a novel that transports them to visionary plots and characters and then stumble into the possibility that they have authored VF? Perhaps an examination of literature that defines VF by Vic and others will set a direction for writers who are trying to understand their literary process. The caution, however, for all who write very complex creations like novels is that writing craft is always essential. The novel is a form that is not easy to master. For those who cannot stay the rigorous course of learning to write novels, it is perhaps better to take the Ralph Waldo Emerson road and write essays. Emerson’s essay on Self-Reliance is a touchstone for all of us who challenge authority with our VF. Take courage! How you live and what you write is important.

    • Thanks for joining the conversation, Monty. I agree that the novel in any form is a bucking bronco. Add that it often takes years and thus requires memory across a longer span of time and it can be double trouble. I am grateful for all the computer tools available to keep things organized when my brain runs out of synapses to hold all the material.

      • Our duty to our art form is to stay in the flow of the creative process and thus be worthy of whatever gifts nature has allotted to us. Be faithful to the will to art and you will fulfill the purpose even when the goal seems vague and distant. I say this to myself as much as I offer it to you and our friends on the VF path.

    • Monty,
      I couldn’t agree more. I have read a few VF novels that sadly fall short because they end up proselytizing. Instead of using story to entertain, and transform or expand a reader’s consciousness through the character’s experiences, they become a thinly veiled soap box. This, of course, detracts from the true art and craft of fiction writing. And, unfortunately, it is a poor reflection of the VF genre.
      Of course, every novel has a theme, yet in the cases I am referring to, it seems that characters are there to be a two-dimensional mouthpiece for the author’s viewpoint, rather than to enrich a story, move it forward, or, through conflict, transform their fatal flaws! Yes, a better road for such writing would be to compose an essay.
      I keep the goals of VF in mind and heart when crafting my novels, and strive, hopefully successfully, to avoid such pitfalls! Your point has inspired me to write an article on this very subject!

      • ‘Guy thing’ perfectly understood ‘unfortunately’ as my short visit to your shores found that understanding anyone else’s’ jargon wasn’t reciprocated. Seems the US of A is still a bit isolationism oriented re the rest of the World! But I digress. However, that it [engineer] struck you as intuitively appropriate leaves me nothing to say, as it somehow hits the nail on the head. And that’s because I agree wholeheartedly that the ‘advanced’ VF writer will transcend the Male/Female dichotomy. My guess is, that each one of us is unique and different in our approach. Mine favours trusting my er.. inner wisdom – gnost – intuition – Divine guidance — whatever, to keep supplying me with the next sentence, next para, next chapter, and so far it’s sort of worked. When working on This Strange and Precious Thing, my second stab at fiction, (VF) each morning I’d sit at my keyboard with my mind empty, saying to myself, What the **** am I going to write today? And it would just come! –usually. Occasionally I’d lose myself and have to track back. But never did any plotting.

        Strange and Precious was a story with 2 main characters; one male from 200 years in the future, one contemporary female. And this gave my editor, (who’d never heard of VF) a headache. ‘You’ve got to decide which of them is your main voce and keep to that viewpoint,’ she told me. I told her, NO. Wait till its finished and read it all, then you’ll see what I’m aiming at, I said. She did, and the rest is history. The review she wrote said; Superb! Visually graphic and hauntingly evocative, with a lightness of touch that allows profound points to be made without overt moralising. The love story at the heart of the book is moving in its inference of hope for us all, gods and humans alike.

      • [This to esdragon2 below. If nothing else, we’ll find out where WordPress decides to put it. I clicked “reply” next to visionaryfictionauthor of 10/24 at 7:07–the closest level I could locate.] Esme, it sounds like you may be questioning American exceptionalism. Didn’t you guys learn anything from the loss in the Revolutionary War? (smile face)

        Interesting that you too attempted to illustrate the synthesis of male/female dichotomy in Strange and Precious; I’ll have to check it out. Somewhat envious of your gift for plotting when I all but have to use Leggos to engineer my books so they don’t fall apart in the latter stages. Maybe next lifetime I’ll come back as a woman author and do some comparisons; that in itself would make for an interesting plot.

      • My mentor, George Garrett, quoted “the sweet singer of Michigan” when he warned us that “the literary is very hard to do.” As a magazine editor who hired MFA graduates who thought that they were writers, I realized that George’s point was proven. Each form requires craft skills that must be learned. Few novelists, for example, write good plays. They don’t take time to master the stage craft. I look forward to reading your “inspired” essay.

  4. Vic, I second PJ’s suggestion, “you really should submit this article to a national publication.” Your post is well-thought out and well presented and needs to be shared in order to get the word out about VF. Highlights: 1. “Mind/consciousness development is the make-break ingredient in Visionary Fiction. If it’s missing, it’s not Visionary Fiction—it’s that simple.” 2. “In Visionary Fiction, esoteric wisdom is embedded in story so that the reader can actually experience it, instead of merely learning about it.” 3. ”Visionary Fiction “is universal in its worldview and scope.” 4. “VF is the genre proper to spirituality. 5. ” In VF…”extraordinary phenomena not only happen, but drive the plot and its characters.” Thank you for pulling all this together.

    • Vic, and apologies to Margaret for usurping her space – but now I’m double baffled. I clicked ‘reply’ under your, i.e. Vic’s response to me, and it appeared under Margaret’s. Well Vic; I wasn’t around in the Revolutionary War, not to my knowledge – altho I’ve apparently had a few peculiar lifetimes I cant remember – but I think you suggestion of a story where you come back as a woman author…. Sounds Great!

  5. You have done a great service to us all, Vic. And yes, please do submit this to a national (international !) publication. Other ‘Highlights’ for me, were, ‘In VF birth begets rebirth at a higher level.’ ‘VF enlightens and expands the reader’s awareness.’ If I may quote a young reader’s letter to me after reading my first book, Pathway Into Sunrise, she says, ‘ [it] gave me the opportunity to journey with you as a creator, not just reading a story, but it was like watching a painter, feeling her own energy flow whilst creating a painting, rather than looking at the painting hanging on the wall as a flat picture. I began to feel different parts of myself starting to fit together …. As your story unfolds our journey expands. All our energies weave together creating a timeless playground of experience, emotions and understanding.’
    When I wrote Pathway 20 years ago, my first ever attempt at writing, I’d never heard of Visionary Fiction, yet it seems I must have been creating within that genre even then.

  6. You have done us a great service, Vic. And, yes, please do submit this to a national/international publication. Highlights for me were; ‘In VF birth begets rebirth at a higher level,’ ‘VF enlightens and expands the reader’s awareness – the reader can actually experience it.’ If I may quote a young readers letter to me after reading my first ever book, Pathway Into Sunrise, she says,’ [it] gave me the opportunity to journey with you as a creator, not just reading a story, but it was like watching a painter and feeling her energy flow as she created the painting, rather than looking at a flat picture hanging on a wall. I began to feel many different pieces of myself starting to fit together … As your story unfolds our journey expands. All our energies weave together creating a timeless, spaceless playground of experience, emotions and understanding.’
    At the time I wrote Pathway, 20 years ago, I’d never heard of Visionary Fiction, yet it seems I was working within that genre, even then!

    • Thank you, Esme. Your young reader is beautifully articulate.

      On the reader sharing the growth experience, I had an epiphany, while writing the article, that comes out best in the lines: “This element engineered into the work, is perhaps VF’s most innovative, and also its most difficult to achieve. Visionary Fiction renders the reading experience interactive.” I’d never defined this process for myself quite that succinctly, although I sensed in a hazy way that it was what I was trying to do. Now that I’ve made it conscious by thinking it through and writing it out, it should make it easier and more effective in my work. One of those things I’d love to see more conversation among authors on.

      • Thanks Vic. And I didn’t make it up! re the young reader. In fact I still have the email(s) she sent with her text. (Smiley here) I like in your above, ‘V F renders the reading experience interactive.’ For me though, I feel you (one) can’t ‘engineer’ that elusive element into the work; it’s an innate and intuitive skill. But that might just be my Feminine mind.

    • Vic, now that you have identified the need to make the reading experience interactive, hopefully it will be easier for all of us to ensure that that important element is part of our work. Again, this is an important article on the nature of Visionary Fiction, and you’ve done us all a service by writing and sharing it.

    • Although I said it jokingly I’d still like to object to the word engineer in respect of allowing in the element of interactive experience. The word does have masculine mind-driven and rather rigid connotations. Road building, engines travelling on train tracks, construction machinery, etc.. Words are important in the sense of what we, the readers, infer from them, consciously or unconsciously, I think.

      • And yet, I work at a software company with around 100 engineers, and roughly a third of them are women. Granted, the numbers could be better, but engineering – whether it be software, construction, or manufacturing – is no longer just a man’s game. My daughter is making a name for herself in the gaming industry as a gaming physics engineer. The times, they are a-changing.

      • Yes, of course you are right. Women can be, and are engineers. My 15 year old granddaughter for instance is studying astrophysics, and not only studying, but opted of her own free will to take the subject in a girl’s only school, and she ‘s the star pupil in the class. (Forgive the pun!) But that wasn’t the point I was making. It was the word itself I was questioning in regard to V F and its place in writing about interactive experience.

  7. Nice pick up on the word “engineered,” Esme. Write it off as a “guy thing” (don’t know how well that Americanism translates into British English) if you like. I admit to not choosing it as carefully as some of my words, but it struck me as intuitively (!) appropriate for the process I was trying to describe. When I considered the complexity in my first novel, The Anathemas, of inducing a reader, accustomed to single-lifetime thinking, to experience, perhaps subconsciously, existence from a multi-lifetime viewpoint, right down to the outlines and spreadsheets required to keep it all straight, it felt like engineering. It evidently succeeded with at least one Goodreads reviewer who remarked that the book “gives a sense of what it is like to relive a past life in the present.”

    On the male-female dichotomy, I like to think that the advanced VF writer has himself transcended that duality and achieved the synthesis that lies beyond it. One reason why in The Anathemas I chose to have two viewpoint characters, one male (Richard/Justinian) and the other female (Jennifer/Theodora). By presenting the reader with the story from both sides, I hoped to get them to experience that synthesis beyond, which, as far as I know, has not yet been named. And that sleight-of-hand took some engineering.

    Great discussions going on so far with this thread. Thanks to all for contributing. Discovering our genre together is exhilarating.

  8. Vic, I’ve no idea why, but my reply to yours on ‘engineering’, which I wrote in the box below your piece. has appeared under Monyt’s piece eleven comments above this!!!!!!

      • Thanks for your commiserations – if that was what it was! But this has happened twice now. On10.22.2013 I wrote out a full response to Vic’s praiseworthy and thoughtful piece only to have it disappear when I pressed the post comment button. ‘Imaging my surprise’ frustration/bewilderment when after taking the trouble to re-write it- and from memory!- I found it had reappeared the next day. And then there were 2!
        And now today, my efforts, which took me over an hour, suddenly appeared on pressing Post Comment button beneath Vic’s reply to me, under another reply to Monty 11 threads further up! (If this sounds like gobbledegook to you, it certainly sounds like it to me.)

      • I wish I had a better answer for you. Even as the administrator of this site, all I can do is click the Reply button and hope for the best.

        Does anyone else have more experience with WordPress and understand this phenomenon?

  9. I’m beginning to think there’s something weird about me. I’m having trouble with the lights in our house now! I switched on the main bathroom light which lights up the hand-wash basin and mirror, but the small LED in the shower came on instead, leaving the room in semi darkness. So I switched it off, and the main light sprang on! Either I’ve developed some new phenomenal and scary powers — or we’re in for a big electrician’s bill!

    • Oh, how funny, Esme! Don’t think of your new magnetic personality as a problem, but as an opportunity to “light up the room” wherever you are. (;

      • Let this be a warning to all ‘advanced’ (vis Vic) Visionary F writers. Who knows where this expansion of consciousness will take us!

  10. Pingback: A Case for Visionary Fiction, Part 3: Action Plan | Fiction for a New Age

  11. Pingback: VF as a Genre: Part 4 – Populating BISAC’s VF Category | Visionary Fiction Alliance

  12. Pingback: What is NOT Visionary Fiction? | Visionary Fiction Alliance

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