Avoid the common mistake spiritual novelists make

Guest post by by Rod Pennington, coauthor of The Fourth Awakening

Don’t preach!

Probably the most common problem with books in the new age or spiritual space is the author simply can’t resist the urge to dust off the soapbox and start making speeches. No one likes to be lectured to, and few are thirsting to pay hard-earned entertainment dollars to sit through a sermon.

While you may strongly believe in what you’re saying, it is your job to make the case for your viewpoint to a skeptical reader. I highly recommend including an outspoken character with an opposing view as a major player in your cast of characters.

In The Fourth Awakening Series, I have the two primary protagonists — an enlightened soul and a highly skeptical Pulitzer Prize winning journalist — slugging it out on pretty much every page. Not only does this make the characters more real, it affords the writer the opportunity to deliver the desired message without having the narrator don silken robe and ascend to the pulpit.

It is much better to allow your readers to watch two characters debate than to have it appear pre-determined that only one viewpoint will do.

Rod Pennington has published eight novels and sold multiple screenplays. In addition to the Fourth Awakening series he recently launched a new dark comedy series about a dysfunctional family of four of the world’s best assassins working as the enforcement arm for a shadowy Zen cabal that has been around for thousands of years: A Family Reunion (The First Charon Family Adventure).

Advertisements

One thought on “Avoid the common mistake spiritual novelists make

  1. Pingback: Book review–Mixer: on a Strand | Fiction for a New Age

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s